Great Scotland Yard, the newest Hyatt in (London) town

 

 

Hyatt opened the much anticipated (and delayed) Great Scotland Yard hotel last Monday evening. Located a few steps from Whitehall and Trafalgar Square, it provides a strategic addition to the Hyatt group in London. Their other properties, the Andaz at Liverpool Street and the Hyatt Regency Churchill are east and west of the centre respectively. It is also the first Unbound Collection property in London.

The building was once the head of the London (Metropolitan) Police and this is the theme that runs through the property. Old criminal gangs are celebrated in one of the bars, whilst up to date justice is recognised through artworks from a charity that works with modern day offenders and are located throughout the lobby.

The Experience on my stay was superb, in fact it is hard to praise the place too highly. I know that this is often the case when places are new, but I really did feel a genuinely warm welcome from everyone I encountered. The lobby is a few steps down from the entrance – I won’t say in the old calls as that would be inaccurate, but on a mezzanine level. The staff were ready and waiting to take my bag to the reception desks on the right. Two members of staff sat behind large desks made up of old suitcases. It gave a hint as to what was coming.

After check-in the team took me on a tour of the ground floor.

Sibin is the ‘secret’ whisky bar located behind the bookcases – press the button to gain access.

Outside are a number of small sitting areas including a wonderful ‘throne’ shaped as a Rhino – truly a one off piece of work.

The restaurant – The Yard by Robin Gill – is where Globalist members of the World of Hyatt will take their breakfasts. I arrived early evening and though the space was really special – intimate, open kitchen areas and a staff ready to receive customers.

The

This is the signature restaurant and is open during the day as follows:

Breakfast: 7am – 10:30am
Lunch: 12pm – 2pm
Dinner: 5:30pm – 10:30pm

The Parlour offers a nice sitting area with a very high end afternoon tea:

Lounge: 11am – 2pm
Afternoon Tea: 2:30pm – 6pm

A stunning piece of artwork is just outside and adjacent to the lifts. It notes the history to various aspects of policing in London over the years, with Sir Robert Peel right in the middle.

I had been give a Koestler Suite which had a very different layout to most suites. It was in the form of an ‘L’ shape with the sitting room on the right as you entered – two comfy chairs and a table with 4 chairs, the bathroom on the right and the bedroom at the end of the corridor. Every inch of space is used for, as in most major cities, real estate is at a premium. The finishes are of a high quality – wooden floors, thick carpet and marble are all used to good effect.

The bathroom had a shower only, but an automatic toilet which is unusual for London.

The bedroom and the sitting room both had large TV’s which you could angle to your preferred position. A very good range of channels were offered.

As with all Hyatt beds I slept well. The room was a little warm and I couldn’t get it to a temperature where I could sleep so I opened the window a little which let in enough cold air for comfort. The bedroom is not large, but you only spend time sleeping there and the rest sitting the parlour.

I couldn’t find the Room Service menu but they tell me that they have one.

The room key is RFID, but wooden!

The first floor room layout

I had to leave before breakfast the next morning and so didn’t get a chance to try it.

SUMMARY

I cannot wait to find an excuse to return. This is going to become one of the Hyatt’s star properties if my stay was anything to go by. As the Unbound collection promises, it is a unique property in a great location.

Comments

  1. Are you sure that’s the Koestler Suite and not the louis? I just checked in and I swore they said Louis suite but it looks identical to yours.

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