It was incredibly busy at JFK on Friday with queues stretching the full
length of the terminal.
Luckily Global Entry recently advised me that I was eligible for TSAPre.
The boarding pass issued in Paris showed the code correctly and I was through in 30 seconds.
However my domestic flights today did not get me TSAPre but I notice my connection to Paris tomorrow does have Pre endorsed on the boarding pass.
I wonder if it is the fact that the bookings that get Pre have my passport in, but the domestic one did not.
Of course it could just
be the random TSA!

Posted by MilesFromBlighty | 9 Comments

9 Responses to “My first TSAPre experiences”

  1. Tom S says:

    You need to contact your airline and make sure your global entry number is listed in your profile. That will ensure that pre check is enabled on all your future domestic flights. What is most likely happening here is the passport number that is confirmed by the airline before you check in is providing the pre check clearance but because it isn’t on your profile with the airline they aren’t doing it for domestic segments. Good luck. TSA Pre has saved me probably hours of time since it’s inception last year.

  2. mcdullhk88 says:

    “I wonder if it is the fact that the bookings that get Pre have my passport in, but the domestic one did not.”

    I’m guessing it is the passport that made the difference. I have always gotten PreCheck domestically, but I also always put my passport number into the passenger details on domestic flights.

  3. Kerwin says:

    Welcome to how life used to be :).
    It’s totally random they say.

  4. Kerwin says:

    Once you have the TSAPre number in your frequent flyer profile for the airline you are flying and that number is in the reservation at the time of check-in, you are good to go. The rests is in the TSA’s hands.

  5. Alan says:

    I note the comments re putting your GE number in your profile, however my impression is that this is only possible if you are crediting to a USA-based FF programme? There’s no area on for example BAEC to enter this, even though flying with AA.

  6. @Alan – yes indeed you are correct. I credited to my BA account, but somehow, when the passport info was in the reservation and I had my GE number in my AAdvantage profile, I got PreCheck. When no passport info in – No PreCheck. I may be over reading this, but will report in two weeks when I am on UA and crediting UA with my GE number in my UA profile.
    Very few of my AA trips for the rest of the year are only domestic, but I will keep everyone up to date with what happens.

  7. Alan says:

    Thanks, this sounds like a potentially useful development if having the GE-enrolled passport number in the booking is sufficient to trigger Pre. I’ve got an AA a/c but I want to credit the flights to BA for TPs, so would be good if this worked! (my domestic flights are part of my international itinerary so hopefully the passport number would show across them all)

  8. Kerwin says:

    It’s the TSAPre number that triggers TSAPre, not the Global Entry number.
    If you switch ff numbers and the airline is not setup for TSAPre, you won’t get it.

  9. Alan says:

    I thought when they added Pre to GE they said it was your GOES number that you should still use? I only expected it to work on flights bring credited to US FF programmes where you could enter the number, hence why the experience reported in this blog post is interesting.

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